AGN Europe Taxation Task Force

 

The AGN Europe Taxation Task Force produces annual Tax Brochures. These contain tables that show the main aspects of a tax that are easily and quickly compared between the European Countries participating in the surveys. There is also a graph comparing the most important data, and an article with an overview of the European situation in 2015. These brochures are available in electronic format and have been designed so you can easily print them in-house if you prefer.

 

Corporate Tax 2015

European Countries Comparison

Nominal corporate tax rates range from 12.5% (Cyprus, Liechtenstein and Ireland) to 33-34% (Belgium and France). Romania (16%), the Czech Republic (19%) and Poland (19%) are also quite low, whereas Germany, Greece and Spain all show nominal rates of at least 26%. A notable exception is the Isle of Man, where – apart from rental profits from Manx property, and local banking services – no corporate tax is charged.

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Gift & Inheritance 2015

European Countries Comparison

The Survey concentrated on detailed questions affecting calculation of the tax rate, such as the relevance of the relationship of the heirs to the deceased. In some jurisdictions, such as France, there were ‘forced heirship’ rules which dictated who must benefit from the deceased’s estate and in what proportion. Most other jurisdictions allowed relative freedom to choose the beneficiaries of an estate, so careful planning may enable some reduction on the overall inheritance tax rate payable. […]

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Parent Companies 2015

European Countries Comparison

Net cash receivable by non-resident parent company: The Isle of Man pays the highest net dividend to a shareholder resident in a non-treaty country which amounts to 100% of the profit made by the parent company, followed by  Switzerland (98,52%), Cyprus (95,08%) and Denmark (93%) .Bottom of the list comes Portugal (54%), the Czech Republic (60,14%) and Greece  (63,68%). […]

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Salaries & Social Security Tax 2015

European Countries Comparison

Most countries made only slight changes. France became cheaper compared to last year  so the country that was the most expensive for an employer remained so. That makes France still the most expensive country to hire an employee because of an employer’s social security contribution of  €42,133. Likewise employees are still much better off in Russia than Finland. (Almost twice as well off.) Finland has the lowest net salary of this survey. It is interesting to notice that Sweden and Belgium did not make any changes in the income tax and social security premiums in the last five years. Maybe this is why Belgium is one of the most expensive countries to hire employees of Europe. […]

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Self Employed Tax 2015

European Countries Comparison

Income Tax and Social Security: As almost every country surveyed requires self employed persons to pay social security contributions it is clear that in order to make the best comparison it is necessary to consider both tax and social security contributions. Taking the two of them together shows that Germany leaves the least amount of money in the hands of the individual (35.6%) followed by Belgium (35.7%) and Portugal (45%).The best results are offered by Russia (94%), Isle of Man (82%) and Czech Republic (81%). […]

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VAT 2015

European Countries Comparison

The survey shows that there continue to be opportunities and pitfalls for businesses trading cross border. This is not unexpected in relation to non EU countries who may be influenced but are clearly not bound by EU VAT rules. What is more surprising is the degree of variation demonstrated by those jurisdictions that are inside the EU .[…]

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